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Posted on 31st Jul at 6:01 AM, with 483,918 notes

timetravelingtrickster:

I’m sorry, you must be at least a level 4 friend to unlock my tragic backstory

Posted on 31st Jul at 3:01 AM, with 634,015 notes

aieon:

It may seem like I’m a sarcastic asshole 24/7, but I’m actually only a sarcastic asshole 18/7 because at night I actually have feelings.

Posted on 30th Jul at 9:09 PM, with 14,448 notes
chead asked: hey what's up with the "!" in fandoms? i.e. "fat!<thing>" just curious thaxxx <3

continuants:

aeide-thea:

nentuaby:

hosekisama:

molly-ren:

I have asked this myself in the past and never gotten an answer.

Maybe today will be the day we are both finally enlightened.

It’s a way of referring to particular variations of (usually) a character — dark!Will, junkie!Sherlock, et cetera. I have suspected for a while that it originated from some archive system that didn’t accommodate spaces in its tags, so to make common interpretations/versions of the characters searchable, people started jamming the words together with an infix.

(Lately I’ve seen people use the ! notation when the suffix isn’t the full name, but is actually the second part of a common fandom portmanteau. This bothers me a lot but it happens, so it’s worth being aware of.)

Bang paths (“!” is called a “bang” when not used for emphasis) were the first addressing scheme for email, before modern automatic routing was set up. If you wanted to write a mail to the Steve here in Engineering, you just wrote “Steve” in the to: field and the computer sent it to the local account named Steve. But if it was Steve over in the physics department, you wrote it to phys!Steve; the computer sent it to the “phys” computer, which sent it in turn to the Steve account. To get Steve in the Art department over at NYU, you wrote NYU!art!Steve—your computer sends it to the NYU gateway computer sends it to the “art” computer sends it to the Steve account, etc. (The “!” symbol was chosen because it was on the keyboard, not too visually noisy, and not used for a huge lot already.)

It became pretty standard jargon, as I understand, to disambiguate when writing to other humans. First phys!Steve vs. the Steve right next to you, just as if you were talking to the machine, then getting looser (as jargon does) to reference, say, bearded!Steve vs bald!Steve.

So I’m guessing alternate character version tags probably came from that.

history! :D

Additionally, it allegedly first appeared within the X-Files fandom, but it’s hard to find actual sources because the Usenet archive on Google Groups ignores the !

Posted on 30th Jul at 9:08 PM, with 240,590 notes

plantkitten:

i love you im glad you exist im so happy you’re alive

Tagged: #inspiration,
Posted on 30th Jul at 9:01 AM, with 412,577 notes

housewifeswag:

bayareamom:

gillianandersons:

do you ever realize that there was a moment when your mom or dad put you down as a baby and never picked you up again

Wtf

this fucked me up

Posted on 30th Jul at 6:01 AM, with 152,746 notes

meladoodle:

why do blind people walk their dogs so much

Posted on 29th Jul at 6:01 AM, with 297,812 notes

jaclcfrost:

[finds the most sarcastic asshole in the series] my love

Posted on 29th Jul at 3:00 AM, with 290,201 notes
chubby-bunnies:

barackthehalls:

neonshi:

milafawnkawaiielfgoddessangelic:

truthtellingtime:

Just so everybody knows, the mirror is actually more reliable than the camera. Even though people say “the camera never lies”, it distorts your photographs a little bit. It has to turn a 3d image (you in real life) to a 2d image (a photograph) and consequently skews the proportions a little bit.
Also, “photogenic” is a real thing. Certain faces photograph well and others don’t. It’s all down the angles, proportions and size of your features.
Have you ever seen someone stunning who looks great in professional photographs and not in candids? Yeah, that’s because there’s a huge difference between a professional and an amateur. Professionals know how to minimise the issues cameras have. Lighting, angles and even the distance you are away from the camera plays a part (the amount of distortion varies depending on how close you are).
TL;DR if you think you look great in the mirror but not in the photo, trust the mirror. You look great!

NOT ONLY THAT, but when you look in a mirror, you’re seeing your face in motion, how others would see it. In a photograph, you’re still, and it can make small flaws and the like seem a lot more prominent, despite them being quite minuscule in person.

Also! Also, when you see yourself in the mirror you are looking at your face reverse of how a camera picks it up. No face is perfectly symmetrical so you get so used to seeing a mirrored version of your face that when it’s flipped in a picture you subconsciously notice the tiny differences in your face and thus you think you don’t look right.

I have never felt so relieved and beautiful thank you guys

needed this today
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chubby-bunnies:

barackthehalls:

neonshi:

milafawnkawaiielfgoddessangelic:

truthtellingtime:

Just so everybody knows, the mirror is actually more reliable than the camera. Even though people say “the camera never lies”, it distorts your photographs a little bit. It has to turn a 3d image (you in real life) to a 2d image (a photograph) and consequently skews the proportions a little bit.

Also, “photogenic” is a real thing. Certain faces photograph well and others don’t. It’s all down the angles, proportions and size of your features.

Have you ever seen someone stunning who looks great in professional photographs and not in candids? Yeah, that’s because there’s a huge difference between a professional and an amateur. Professionals know how to minimise the issues cameras have. Lighting, angles and even the distance you are away from the camera plays a part (the amount of distortion varies depending on how close you are).

TL;DR if you think you look great in the mirror but not in the photo, trust the mirror. You look great!

NOT ONLY THAT, but when you look in a mirror, you’re seeing your face in motion, how others would see it. In a photograph, you’re still, and it can make small flaws and the like seem a lot more prominent, despite them being quite minuscule in person.

Also! Also, when you see yourself in the mirror you are looking at your face reverse of how a camera picks it up. No face is perfectly symmetrical so you get so used to seeing a mirrored version of your face that when it’s flipped in a picture you subconsciously notice the tiny differences in your face and thus you think you don’t look right.

I have never felt so relieved and beautiful thank you guys

needed this today

Posted on 28th Jul at 1:05 PM, with 401,965 notes

ooh-bite-me:

when your mom walks up behind you while you’re blogging

image

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